A Process Without Due Process

January 15, 2012

By Lana Alamat 

In the past few months, the media has been dominated with news of the government’s campaign to fight corruption and, most recently, the detentions relating to the Greater Amman Municipality files. Trust me when I say that 90 percent of the information published by the media has been legally and technically inaccurate. But theatrics sell and Jordanians seem to have given up long ago on journalistic standards and ethics. Be that as it may, and as misleading as the coverage has been, it’s not what has kept me up at night. Putting aside conspiracy theories on how the media, the judiciary, and the parliament are “used” to serve political ends, I am gravely concerned by the lack of the most basic of due process rights in our criminal judicial system. It makes me think, is this the Jordan we want to live in?

I must admit, my training as a lawyer was in the US. However, and with all due respect to our civil law system in Jordan, any lawyer – regardless of background – must see a criminal justice system within the rubric of a constitution that guarantees procedural due process: a set of rules that safeguard fundamental fairness, justice, and liberty. In essence, this should guarantee that all legal proceedings will be fair and that one will be given notice of the proceedings and an opportunity to be heard before the government acts to take away one’s life, liberty, or property – the law shall not be unreasonable, arbitrary, or capricious.

I was able to practice these theories during the time I worked in the public defender system as a law student in St. Louis, Missouri. I represented the underprivileged in some of the most gruesome of crimes. Most of my clients had long criminal records, history of substance abuse and always a very sad story of how minor offenders can leave a prison system to become felons. Yet, even with such records, before a prosecutor could even levy a charge, he or she had to submit proof. As soon as a complaint was filed, I was entitled to a copy of the entire file, any and all evidence within the prosecutor’s possession, and most importantly a day in court. The prosecutor had to prove to a judge or grand jury that there was probable cause to accuse my client. This meant that the prosecutor had to submit credible evidence to a third party to support each and every element of the alleged crime in addition to evidence to support detention if the gravity of the crime necessitated such detention. Nothing short of proof of grave flight risk or the threat of physical harm to the safety of others would have sufficed for detention. Under basic due process principles, a suspect’s remand should be subject to independent judicial authorization.

These very basic first steps are lacking in today’s criminal justice processes in Jordan. How often have we heard of people who have been prevented from travel only to be informed at the airport before boarding a flight? The detentions of Omar Maani and Amer Bashir have also lacked the very minimum standards of procedural due process. The public prosecutor, the person vested with the investigation process, is judge jury and executioner! He is able to accuse, prevent travel, and detain pending investigations without having to produce any evidence. Simple statements such as “the release will affect the course of the investigations” seem to have been more than enough justification. What is worse, the attorney general, who also represents the government, has the right to appeal the public prosecutor’s decisions not to detain or to grant bail. The government gets two bites at the apple: the prosecutor (aka the government) decided to release Omar Maani after weeks of rejecting bail, then the attorney general (also the government) was able to appeal the decision? Then very next day, Amer Bashir was detained on the very same accusations facing Omar Maani. And we haven’t even started a trial! You don’t need to be a lawyer to see the contradictions.

Also, consider this: the investigation may take months while one is detained without the opportunity to review the evidence to challenge the detention. The process is clearly structured with the presumption that the interest of the government, NOT the citizen, is more worthy of protection.

The Jordanian constitution enshrines the fundamental principal that citizens are innocent until proven guilty. This presumption means that in front the overwhelming power of the state, the law must shield citizens and ensure that proper checks and balances exist. It gives me pause that many Jordanians are cheering these arrests and detentions. I always ask, if it were you, your brother or sister thrown in detention, wouldn’t you want the opportunity to defend yourself before being deprived of your liberty? As tax payers, we should all welcome a war against corruption, but the ends never justify the means. I wonder whether we have been desensitized or have we never come to value the liberty of humans.

Due process means a judicial system that presumes innocence before otherwise established, hears before it condemns, and bears the burden of proof before judgment. The judicial system is the last of our safeguards. If it fails, no constitutional amendment or national committee will be able to protect us from ourselves.

  • Sarayazan11

    this is great! thank you for sharing. i really appreciate the professionalism and intellect behind your well structured argument…. innocent until proven guilty!!!!
     

  • Sarayazan11

    this is great! thank you for sharing. i really appreciate the professionalism and intellect behind your well structured argument…. innocent until proven guilty!!!!
     

  • asd

    “Trust me”?

    You write funny.

    • Wolffang_91

      Shut up.

  • asd

    “Trust me”?

    You write funny.

    • Wolffang_91

      Shut up.

  • Great

    What a great article. I pray it does NOT fall on deaf ears.

  • Great

    What a great article. I pray it does NOT fall on deaf ears.

  • Mahasneh52

    Great stuff and excellent impressive material.

  • Mahasneh52

    Great stuff and excellent impressive material.

  • Mahasneh52

    Great stuff and excellent impressive material.

  • Guest 007

    Ok, Lama, it seems you are mixing few things, neither the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor represent the government, they represent us, they are both judges and belong to the Judicial branch and government has zero power over them.
    Bailing out is a court decision – محكمة البداية – and in this case it is not the decision of the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor, other wise why they contesting it?
    Because bailing and not bailing is a court decision, the only way to reverse it is by a higher court decision, what we call here محكمة الاستئناف and if the defendant lawyer doesn’t like that decision too, he can go to the highest court in Jordan محكمة التمييز as happened with Shahin & company bailing case.The whole process is outlined in a law called  قانون اصول المحاكمات الجزائية  the due process, which in this case monitors the judges adherence to the law above, is نظام التفتيش القضائي.
    What I agree with you, is that the prosecutor can detain a person for 15 days extendable upon his judgment, however, refusing bailing can be contested at three different levels of تقاضي.

    • R 85389

      statement of the existence of a procedure does not mean it is fair , just, and reasonable ?
      otherwise why amend it for all future times ?!!!!!

      Due process must remove human whim and ground detention on well laid down rules that itself must satisfy a test of constiutional probity.

      There is now a need to develop our police doctirne and practice towards positive police outcomes rather than perpetual demonization of the offender .

      The best guarantor of our judicial and legal system is the quality of our human being that have demonstrated a well-intentioned and positive mindset towards public interest and progress and never chaos and turmoil – we need to give this good human being a good law to safeguard her and him .

      • Guest 007

        I have to tell you this first, I spent 15 min trying to resolve R 85389, to find out that you were born on 89.03.1985, correct? 🙂 just kidding.
        Ok, so, why don’t you be more specific instead of using bla bla terms.Lets examine the procedure, and be aware here that we are talking about the Maani case:1- In 2010, long time before the Arab Spring or the corruption investigation in Jordan, ديوان المحاسبة issued a lengthy report talking about tens of  violations in Amanet Amman.
        2- The whole file went to both هيئة مكافحة الفساد and لجنة تحقيق في مجلس النواب and they both confirmed an existence of problems and decided to send it back to government to send it to the court.

        http://www.ejjbed.com/viewPost.php?id=24988&sec_id=14

        So, here, I guess you mentioned improving the Police investigation prodecure, which I do agree about, but not in corruption cases, for very obvious reasons.

        All this time, no one was accused or detained, fair?

        3- The whole file went to the table of the prosecutor, who kicked off a third invistigation now, and requested to detain the defendant.

        4- The bail out was refused by محكمة البداية which means another judge has looked into the investigation and the reasons for detaining and found grounds for that.
         5- At this moment the defendant lawyer had the right to go to a higher court محكمة الاستئناف to contest the decision, yet he didn’t do that, you can ask him why.
        6- Later on the court decided to accept the bail out, then for the general prosecutor, the only way he could contest that decision is by going to a higher court which he did.

        This is a three stages procedure, at one stage, محكمة التمييز could look into this case with 15 judges on board, this procedure by design is a fair one, as we have some of the best judges and practices that have been adopted by many countries in the region.

        Now, what is your exact problem with the current Jordanian procedure relevant to the case above, can you please be very specific, how do you suggest improving it?

        • Mohandes

          تصحيحا لمعلوماتك وعلى لسان الدكتور فياض القضاة عض هيئة مكافحة الفساد خلال برنامج نبض البلد :” لقد تم سحب ملفات أمانة عمان من هيئئة مكافحة الفساد قبل انتهاء التحقيق عليها مع ان الهيئة كانت قد قطعت اشواطا طويلة في التحقيق” كل هذا وذاك مدعاة للاعتقاد بان الحرب على الفساد باتت سياسية لا قانونية

  • Guest 007

    Ok, Lama, it seems you are mixing few things, neither the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor represent the government, they represent us, they are both judges and belong to the Judicial branch and government has zero power over them.
    Bailing out is a court decision – محكمة البداية – and in this case it is not the decision of the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor, other wise why they contesting it?
    Because bailing and not bailing is a court decision, the only way to reverse it is by a higher court decision, what we call here محكمة الاستئناف and if the defendant lawyer doesn’t like that decision too, he can go to the highest court in Jordan محكمة التمييز as happened with Shahin & company bailing case.The whole process is outlined in a law called  قانون اصول المحاكمات الجزائية  the due process, which in this case monitors the judges adherence to the law above, is نظام التفتيش القضائي.
    What I agree with you, is that the prosecutor can detain a person for 15 days extendable upon his judgment, however, refusing bailing can be contested at three different levels of تقاضي.

    • R 85389

      statement of the existence of a procedure does not mean it is fair , just, and reasonable ?
      otherwise why amend it for all future times ?!!!!!

      Due process must remove human whim and ground detention on well laid down rules that itself must satisfy a test of constiutional probity.

      There is now a need to develop our police doctirne and practice towards positive police outcomes rather than perpetual demonization of the offender .

      The best guarantor of our judicial and legal system is the quality of our human being that have demonstrated a well-intentioned and positive mindset towards public interest and progress and never chaos and turmoil – we need to give this good human being a good law to safeguard her and him .

      • Guest 007

        I have to tell you this first, I spent 15 min trying to resolve R 85389, to find out that you were born on 89.03.1985, correct? 🙂 just kidding.
        Ok, so, why don’t you be more specific instead of using bla bla terms.Lets examine the procedure, and be aware here that we are talking about the Maani case:1- In 2010, long time before the Arab Spring or the corruption investigation in Jordan, ديوان المحاسبة issued a lengthy report talking about tens of  violations in Amanet Amman.
        2- The whole file went to both هيئة مكافحة الفساد and لجنة تحقيق في مجلس النواب and they both confirmed an existence of problems and decided to send it back to government to send it to the court.

        http://www.ejjbed.com/viewPost.php?id=24988&sec_id=14

        So, here, I guess you mentioned improving the Police investigation prodecure, which I do agree about, but not in corruption cases, for very obvious reasons.

        All this time, no one was accused or detained, fair?

        3- The whole file went to the table of the prosecutor, who kicked off a third invistigation now, and requested to detain the defendant.

        4- The bail out was refused by محكمة البداية which means another judge has looked into the investigation and the reasons for detaining and found grounds for that.
         5- At this moment the defendant lawyer had the right to go to a higher court محكمة الاستئناف to contest the decision, yet he didn’t do that, you can ask him why.
        6- Later on the court decided to accept the bail out, then for the general prosecutor, the only way he could contest that decision is by going to a higher court which he did.

        This is a three stages procedure, at one stage, محكمة التمييز could look into this case with 15 judges on board, this procedure by design is a fair one, as we have some of the best judges and practices that have been adopted by many countries in the region.

        Now, what is your exact problem with the current Jordanian procedure relevant to the case above, can you please be very specific, how do you suggest improving it?

        • Mohandes

          تصحيحا لمعلوماتك وعلى لسان الدكتور فياض القضاة عض هيئة مكافحة الفساد خلال برنامج نبض البلد :” لقد تم سحب ملفات أمانة عمان من هيئئة مكافحة الفساد قبل انتهاء التحقيق عليها مع ان الهيئة كانت قد قطعت اشواطا طويلة في التحقيق” كل هذا وذاك مدعاة للاعتقاد بان الحرب على الفساد باتت سياسية لا قانونية

  • Guest 007

    Ok, Lama, it seems you are mixing few things, neither the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor represent the government, they represent us, they are both judges and belong to the Judicial branch and government has zero power over them.
    Bailing out is a court decision – محكمة البداية – and in this case it is not the decision of the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor, other wise why they contesting it?
    Because bailing and not bailing is a court decision, the only way to reverse it is by a higher court decision, what we call here محكمة الاستئناف and if the defendant lawyer doesn’t like that decision too, he can go to the highest court in Jordan محكمة التمييز as happened with Shahin & company bailing case.The whole process is outlined in a law called  قانون اصول المحاكمات الجزائية  the due process, which in this case monitors the judges adherence to the law above, is نظام التفتيش القضائي.
    What I agree with you, is that the prosecutor can detain a person for 15 days extendable upon his judgment, however, refusing bailing can be contested at three different levels of تقاضي.

  • Guest 007

    Ok, Lama, it seems you are mixing few things, neither the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor represent the government, they represent us, they are both judges and belong to the Judicial branch and government has zero power over them.
    Bailing out is a court decision – محكمة البداية – and in this case it is not the decision of the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor, other wise why they contesting it?
    Because bailing and not bailing is a court decision, the only way to reverse it is by a higher court decision, what we call here محكمة الاستئناف and if the defendant lawyer doesn’t like that decision too, he can go to the highest court in Jordan محكمة التمييز as happened with Shahin & company bailing case.The whole process is outlined in a law called  قانون اصول المحاكمات الجزائية  the due process, which in this case monitors the judges adherence to the law above, is نظام التفتيش القضائي.
    What I agree with you, is that the prosecutor can detain a person for 15 days extendable upon his judgment, however, refusing bailing can be contested at three different levels of تقاضي.

  • Guest 007

    Ok, Lama, it seems you are mixing few things, neither the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor represent the government, they represent us, they are both judges and belong to the Judicial branch and government has zero power over them.
    Bailing out is a court decision – محكمة البداية – and in this case it is not the decision of the prosecutor nor the general prosecutor, other wise why they contesting it?
    Because bailing and not bailing is a court decision, the only way to reverse it is by a higher court decision, what we call here محكمة الاستئناف and if the defendant lawyer doesn’t like that decision too, he can go to the highest court in Jordan محكمة التمييز as happened with Shahin & company bailing case.The whole process is outlined in a law called  قانون اصول المحاكمات الجزائية  the due process, which in this case monitors the judges adherence to the law above, is نظام التفتيش القضائي.
    What I agree with you, is that the prosecutor can detain a person for 15 days extendable upon his judgment, however, refusing bailing can be contested at three different levels of تقاضي.

  • Worldly

    Very well written article. Concise & fact driven educated opinion. What this country needs more of. @ asd, Trying reading more.

  • Worldly

    Very well written article. Concise & fact driven educated opinion. What this country needs more of. @ asd, Trying reading more.

  • I
    do agree with most of the things mentioned in this
    piece, but this should be an insight to everyone in Jordan talking
    non-sense about the whole anti-corruption climate nowadays. We
    ought to understand that before we (the entire country) start accusing,
    pointing fingers and start feeling heroic that the Judiciary is purging
    these so called “criminals” for their actions, we must ask whether all these pre-trial investigations and detainment are in line with our constitution.
    I agree that dialogue in these situations would be healthy, but
    misguided and misinformed dialogue is simply an embarrassment to us. How
    will we strive to become a better nation as a whole, when our most
    fundamental institutions are appeasing us with news on illegitimate
    detainment. It is not my place to decide whether these people
    are innocent or guilty. I am simply spreading and commenting, hoping
    that who ever reads this will look at the bigger picture, the sad and
    dark picture that shows what our judicial system is ‘accomplishing’ in
    these investigations. The deprivation of such a rights isn’t in anyone’s
    interest, as it could happen to you someday and you could be innocent.

    And thank you this piece.

  • I
    do agree with most of the things mentioned in this
    piece, but this should be an insight to everyone in Jordan talking
    non-sense about the whole anti-corruption climate nowadays. We
    ought to understand that before we (the entire country) start accusing,
    pointing fingers and start feeling heroic that the Judiciary is purging
    these so called “criminals” for their actions, we must ask whether all these pre-trial investigations and detainment are in line with our constitution.
    I agree that dialogue in these situations would be healthy, but
    misguided and misinformed dialogue is simply an embarrassment to us. How
    will we strive to become a better nation as a whole, when our most
    fundamental institutions are appeasing us with news on illegitimate
    detainment. It is not my place to decide whether these people
    are innocent or guilty. I am simply spreading and commenting, hoping
    that who ever reads this will look at the bigger picture, the sad and
    dark picture that shows what our judicial system is ‘accomplishing’ in
    these investigations. The deprivation of such a rights isn’t in anyone’s
    interest, as it could happen to you someday and you could be innocent.

    And thank you this piece.

  • Taleb

    I have struggled for a memorable name to apply to people like you. I think you are the UnZoro, defenders of the corrupt rich against the downtrodden and oppressed. For years, thousands of Jordanian were denied due process but the only time there is an uproar and calls for justice by the Americanized gangs is when wealthy corrupt Jordanians who have squandered hundreds of millions of tax dollars are locked behind bars. Suddenly, those around them who cashed in on the corruption start oozing with liberalism and human rights and passionate calls for justice, for the wealthy of course not those downtrodden Jordanians who never got a fair shake. None of those who weep over the crooked rich ever wept over the injuries of poor Jordanians. But what do we  expect from a corrupt elite with a sick and twisted sense of right and wrong. And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.

  • Taleb

    I have struggled for a memorable name to apply to people like you. I think you are the UnZoro, defenders of the corrupt rich against the downtrodden and oppressed. For years, thousands of Jordanian were denied due process but the only time there is an uproar and calls for justice by the Americanized gangs is when wealthy corrupt Jordanians who have squandered hundreds of millions of tax dollars are locked behind bars. Suddenly, those around them who cashed in on the corruption start oozing with liberalism and human rights and passionate calls for justice, for the wealthy of course not those downtrodden Jordanians who never got a fair shake. None of those who weep over the crooked rich ever wept over the injuries of poor Jordanians. But what do we  expect from a corrupt elite with a sick and twisted sense of right and wrong. And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.

  • Taleb

    I have struggled for a memorable name to apply to people like you. I think you are the UnZoro, defenders of the corrupt rich against the downtrodden and oppressed. For years, thousands of Jordanian were denied due process but the only time there is an uproar and calls for justice by the Americanized gangs is when wealthy corrupt Jordanians who have squandered hundreds of millions of tax dollars are locked behind bars. Suddenly, those around them who cashed in on the corruption start oozing with liberalism and human rights and passionate calls for justice, for the wealthy of course not those downtrodden Jordanians who never got a fair shake. None of those who weep over the crooked rich ever wept over the injuries of poor Jordanians. But what do we  expect from a corrupt elite with a sick and twisted sense of right and wrong. And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.

    • 23

      Taleb, you shouldn’t be this negative about the article. She is not defending these people she is just giving an insight on the connection these trials have with our constitution, and how some detainment’s are not legitimate.

      Your’e attitude is advocating a very bad thing in my view, that because people didnt comment on this issue in the past as much as they are nowadays, that means we are all rotten corrupt people defending those criminal?

      No I disagree, this is not the way to do it or say it, instead when people become aware of some of the atrocious things courts give power to, they become more informed and that will pave a path to being a more intact country.

      I simply think that you should read between the lines a bit more.

      • Guest

        “And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the
        US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they
        consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for
        misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.”

        23: I think Taleb answered Lana’s point in this paragraph.

        • The True Guest 007

          Man, you are stealing my identity, try Guest 006 🙂

  • Taleb

    I have struggled for a memorable name to apply to people like you. I think you are the UnZoro, defenders of the corrupt rich against the downtrodden and oppressed. For years, thousands of Jordanian were denied due process but the only time there is an uproar and calls for justice by the Americanized gangs is when wealthy corrupt Jordanians who have squandered hundreds of millions of tax dollars are locked behind bars. Suddenly, those around them who cashed in on the corruption start oozing with liberalism and human rights and passionate calls for justice, for the wealthy of course not those downtrodden Jordanians who never got a fair shake. None of those who weep over the crooked rich ever wept over the injuries of poor Jordanians. But what do we  expect from a corrupt elite with a sick and twisted sense of right and wrong. And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.

    • 23

      Taleb, you shouldn’t be this negative about the article. She is not defending these people she is just giving an insight on the connection these trials have with our constitution, and how some detainment’s are not legitimate.

      Your’e attitude is advocating a very bad thing in my view, that because people didnt comment on this issue in the past as much as they are nowadays, that means we are all rotten corrupt people defending those criminal?

      No I disagree, this is not the way to do it or say it, instead when people become aware of some of the atrocious things courts give power to, they become more informed and that will pave a path to being a more intact country.

      I simply think that you should read between the lines a bit more.

      • Guest

        “And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the
        US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they
        consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for
        misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.”

        23: I think Taleb answered Lana’s point in this paragraph.

      • Guest

        “And for someone who claims to be a lawyer, you know that judges in the
        US deny bail to defendants waiting trial on a regular basis when they
        consider them a flight risk. You should be ashamed of yourself for
        misleading the readers about how the legal system works in the US.”

        23: I think Taleb answered Lana’s point in this paragraph.

        • The True Guest 007

          Man, you are stealing my identity, try Guest 006 🙂

  • Kareem El-Farouki

    dear guest 007,

    thank you for the very technical explanation of how the jordanian judiciary works. aside from the technicalities of what the judiciary “can” do is the question of what they “should” do.

    detaining a person such as ex-mayor maani who had appeared for questioning whenever summoned prior to being detained does not sound logical. the man’s place of residence is known, a travel ban was imposed on him which guarantees he’s in the country when needed aside from the more subjective argument that a man of his type of reputation who has his entire life vested in amman (many factories that employee thousands, an extended family of do-gooders who have served the country over many generations etc…)  is unlikely not to fight this thing to the bitter end until his name is cleared. further to all this humiliation was the entirely unncessary decision to freeze maani’s assets. this begs the question why? why freeze a person’s assets when we are still in the process of investigating the possibility of “mismanagement”?

    the case against maani is so weak and vague, its not corruption, embezzelement or any other charge suggesting financial gain… so why freeze his assets?

    if you ask me legal precendent has a lot of weight in the question of bail or no bail. when the average criminal is bailed in jordan, as evident in recent cases of “Salafiyeen” and many many many others, this sets the legal precedents that this is a country that is not keen on detaining people but rather on allowing bail so that one can defend himself in the court of law.

    detaining omar maani or any other jordanian then freezing their assets for suspicion of mismanagement is unacceptable… what a shameful day for jordan…

  • Ramzi

    This is only the tip of the iceberg oF what is wrong with our judicial system in Jordan. What scares me the most is that nobody is addressing this issue in an official capacity. There is no hope of improvement in the foreseeable future.

    • R 85389

      The crux of the issue is the appointment of judges , and the testing of this procedure of appointment of judges , second is the testing of detention procedure – constiutionally and publicly .
       
      That is of course the reason for demanding the Cnstiutional Court .
       
      The determination of doubt as a ground for detention is a colossal anathema in  any legal system as all detention powers in modern countries are judicial with a written order by a judge who has a rigorous law grounded in the fundamental rights against arbitrary action by the state .
       
      There is also the right of having the right to silence and the right to have a lawyer when a citizen is faced with detention .

      We must debate and have differing views then raise it to public opinion then legislate remedies.

      Have no fear; all crimes fear justice and guarantees the truth , but why not a court and a law????!
       
       

  • Kareem El-Farouki

    dear guest 007,

    thank you for the very technical explanation of how the jordanian judiciary works. aside from the technicalities of what the judiciary “can” do is the question of what they “should” do.

    detaining a person such as ex-mayor maani who had appeared for questioning whenever summoned prior to being detained does not sound logical. the man’s place of residence is known, a travel ban was imposed on him which guarantees he’s in the country when needed aside from the more subjective argument that a man of his type of reputation who has his entire life vested in amman (many factories that employee thousands, an extended family of do-gooders who have served the country over many generations etc…)  is unlikely not to fight this thing to the bitter end until his name is cleared. further to all this humiliation was the entirely unncessary decision to freeze maani’s assets. this begs the question why? why freeze a person’s assets when we are still in the process of investigating the possibility of “mismanagement”?

    the case against maani is so weak and vague, its not corruption, embezzelement or any other charge suggesting financial gain… so why freeze his assets?

    if you ask me legal precendent has a lot of weight in the question of bail or no bail. when the average criminal is bailed in jordan, as evident in recent cases of “Salafiyeen” and many many many others, this sets the legal precedents that this is a country that is not keen on detaining people but rather on allowing bail so that one can defend himself in the court of law.

    detaining omar maani or any other jordanian then freezing their assets for suspicion of mismanagement is unacceptable… what a shameful day for jordan…

  • Ramzi

    This is only the tip of the iceberg oF what is wrong with our judicial system in Jordan. What scares me the most is that nobody is addressing this issue in an official capacity. There is no hope of improvement in the foreseeable future.

    • R 85389

      The crux of the issue is the appointment of judges , and the testing of this procedure of appointment of judges , second is the testing of detention procedure – constiutionally and publicly .
       
      That is of course the reason for demanding the Cnstiutional Court .
       
      The determination of doubt as a ground for detention is a colossal anathema in  any legal system as all detention powers in modern countries are judicial with a written order by a judge who has a rigorous law grounded in the fundamental rights against arbitrary action by the state .
       
      There is also the right of having the right to silence and the right to have a lawyer when a citizen is faced with detention .

      We must debate and have differing views then raise it to public opinion then legislate remedies.

      Have no fear; all crimes fear justice and guarantees the truth , but why not a court and a law????!
       
       

  • Sarayazan11

    dear guest 007,

    thank you for the very technical explanation of how the jordanian judiciary works. aside from the technicalities of what the judiciary “can” do is the question of what they “should” do.

    detaining a person such as ex-mayor maani who had appeared for questioning whenever summoned prior to being detained does not sound logical. the man’s place of residence is known, a travel ban was imposed on him which guarantees he’s in the country when needed aside from the more subjective argument that a man of his type of reputation who has his entire life vested in amman (many factories that employee thousands, an extended family of do-gooders who have served the country over many generations etc…)  is unlikely not to fight this thing to the bitter end until his name is cleared. further to all this humiliation was the entirely unncessary decision to freeze maani’s assets. this begs the question why? why freeze a person’s assets when we are still in the process of investigating the possibility of “mismanagement”?

    the case against maani is so weak and vague, its not corruption, embezzelement or any other charge suggesting financial gain… so why freeze his assets?

    if you ask me legal precendent has a lot of weight in the question of bail or no bail. when the average criminal is bailed in jordan, as evident in recent cases of “Salafiyeen” and many many many others, this sets the legal precedents that this is a country that is not keen on detaining people but rather on allowing bail so that one can defend himself in the court of law.

    detaining omar maani or any other jordanian then freezing their assets for suspicion of mismanagement is unacceptable… what a shameful day for jordan…

    • Guest 007

      Ok, three points:
      1- I fully agree that the government needs to go behind all the big cases that also involves even bigger names, and honestly, they have been a bit picky which is causing people to question the motives, still, what are my choices as a citizen today, do I loudly voice my objection for trailing a suspect, or do I empower the Judicial branch and at the same time put more pressure on government to send more cases. If we start to question the process that we always trusted now, this means we are sending a clear message that we are not ready to fight corruption yet, which is not only not correct as we are very well equipped, but it is the biggest gift we can give for the corrupted gangs of Jordan.2- Failure to perform public duties is not a little thing, because you could manage an organization that have surplus, then in 4 years, it is in huge debt because of not having necessary measures for good resources governance.3- If I became the mayor of Amman in 2006, then in 2010 the Audit Bureau issued a 200 pages report outlining many issues and مخالفات قانونية, I had 4 years to fix this organization, and to infuse new systems of good resources governance, doesn’t that say anything about how things were managed, however, I have to say here that there are few good achievements for the man, and they are really good ones, but you know, it is also very smart that a leader knows how to protect achievements by minimizing mistakes.

  • Sarayazan11

    dear guest 007,

    thank you for the very technical explanation of how the jordanian judiciary works. aside from the technicalities of what the judiciary “can” do is the question of what they “should” do.

    detaining a person such as ex-mayor maani who had appeared for questioning whenever summoned prior to being detained does not sound logical. the man’s place of residence is known, a travel ban was imposed on him which guarantees he’s in the country when needed aside from the more subjective argument that a man of his type of reputation who has his entire life vested in amman (many factories that employee thousands, an extended family of do-gooders who have served the country over many generations etc…)  is unlikely not to fight this thing to the bitter end until his name is cleared. further to all this humiliation was the entirely unncessary decision to freeze maani’s assets. this begs the question why? why freeze a person’s assets when we are still in the process of investigating the possibility of “mismanagement”?

    the case against maani is so weak and vague, its not corruption, embezzelement or any other charge suggesting financial gain… so why freeze his assets?

    if you ask me legal precendent has a lot of weight in the question of bail or no bail. when the average criminal is bailed in jordan, as evident in recent cases of “Salafiyeen” and many many many others, this sets the legal precedents that this is a country that is not keen on detaining people but rather on allowing bail so that one can defend himself in the court of law.

    detaining omar maani or any other jordanian then freezing their assets for suspicion of mismanagement is unacceptable… what a shameful day for jordan…

    • Guest 007

      Ok, three points:
      1- I fully agree that the government needs to go behind all the big cases that also involves even bigger names, and honestly, they have been a bit picky which is causing people to question the motives, still, what are my choices as a citizen today, do I loudly voice my objection for trailing a suspect, or do I empower the Judicial branch and at the same time put more pressure on government to send more cases. If we start to question the process that we always trusted now, this means we are sending a clear message that we are not ready to fight corruption yet, which is not only not correct as we are very well equipped, but it is the biggest gift we can give for the corrupted gangs of Jordan.2- Failure to perform public duties is not a little thing, because you could manage an organization that have surplus, then in 4 years, it is in huge debt because of not having necessary measures for good resources governance.3- If I became the mayor of Amman in 2006, then in 2010 the Audit Bureau issued a 200 pages report outlining many issues and مخالفات قانونية, I had 4 years to fix this organization, and to infuse new systems of good resources governance, doesn’t that say anything about how things were managed, however, I have to say here that there are few good achievements for the man, and they are really good ones, but you know, it is also very smart that a leader knows how to protect achievements by minimizing mistakes.

    • Guest 007

      Ok, three points:
      1- I fully agree that the government needs to go behind all the big cases that also involves even bigger names, and honestly, they have been a bit picky which is causing people to question the motives, still, what are my choices as a citizen today, do I loudly voice my objection for trailing a suspect, or do I empower the Judicial branch and at the same time put more pressure on government to send more cases. If we start to question the process that we always trusted now, this means we are sending a clear message that we are not ready to fight corruption yet, which is not only not correct as we are very well equipped, but it is the biggest gift we can give for the corrupted gangs of Jordan.2- Failure to perform public duties is not a little thing, because you could manage an organization that have surplus, then in 4 years, it is in huge debt because of not having necessary measures for good resources governance.3- If I became the mayor of Amman in 2006, then in 2010 the Audit Bureau issued a 200 pages report outlining many issues and مخالفات قانونية, I had 4 years to fix this organization, and to infuse new systems of good resources governance, doesn’t that say anything about how things were managed, however, I have to say here that there are few good achievements for the man, and they are really good ones, but you know, it is also very smart that a leader knows how to protect achievements by minimizing mistakes.

    • Guest 007

      Ok, three points:
      1- I fully agree that the government needs to go behind all the big cases that also involves even bigger names, and honestly, they have been a bit picky which is causing people to question the motives, still, what are my choices as a citizen today, do I loudly voice my objection for trailing a suspect, or do I empower the Judicial branch and at the same time put more pressure on government to send more cases. If we start to question the process that we always trusted now, this means we are sending a clear message that we are not ready to fight corruption yet, which is not only not correct as we are very well equipped, but it is the biggest gift we can give for the corrupted gangs of Jordan.2- Failure to perform public duties is not a little thing, because you could manage an organization that have surplus, then in 4 years, it is in huge debt because of not having necessary measures for good resources governance.3- If I became the mayor of Amman in 2006, then in 2010 the Audit Bureau issued a 200 pages report outlining many issues and مخالفات قانونية, I had 4 years to fix this organization, and to infuse new systems of good resources governance, doesn’t that say anything about how things were managed, however, I have to say here that there are few good achievements for the man, and they are really good ones, but you know, it is also very smart that a leader knows how to protect achievements by minimizing mistakes.

  • Sarayazan11

    dear guest 007,
     
    thank you for the very technical explanation of how the jordanian judiciary works. aside from the technicalities of what the judiciary “can” do is the question of what they “should” do.
     
    detaining a person such as ex-mayor maani who had appeared for questioning whenever summoned prior to being detained does not sound logical. the man’s place of residence is known, a travel ban was imposed on him which guarantees he’s in the country when needed aside from the more subjective argument that a man of his type of reputation who has his entire life vested in amman (many factories that employee thousands, an extended family of do-gooders who have served the country over many generations etc…)  is unlikely not to fight this thing to the bitter end until his name is cleared. further to all this humiliation was the entirely unncessary decision to freeze maani’s assets. this begs the question why? why freeze a person’s assets when we are still in the process of investigating the possibility of “mismanagement”?
     
    the case against maani is so weak and vague, its not corruption, embezzelement or any other charge suggesting financial gain… so why freeze his assets?
     
    if you ask me legal precendent has a lot of weight in the question of bail or no bail. when the average criminal is bailed in jordan, as evident in recent cases of “Salafiyeen” and many many many others, this sets the legal precedents that this is a country that is not keen on detaining people but rather on allowing bail so that one can defend himself in the court of law.
     
    detaining omar maani or any other jordanian then freezing their assets for suspicion of mismanagement is unacceptable… what a shameful day for jordan…
     
     
     

    • R 85389

      why no one asked the same question for those poor in our jails???

    • Abnooz

      He was detained to avoid hiding evidences and arranging with his friends/coworkers/associats.. etc and agree on some arrangment to change/hide things.

  • Sarayazan11

    dear guest 007,
     
    thank you for the very technical explanation of how the jordanian judiciary works. aside from the technicalities of what the judiciary “can” do is the question of what they “should” do.
     
    detaining a person such as ex-mayor maani who had appeared for questioning whenever summoned prior to being detained does not sound logical. the man’s place of residence is known, a travel ban was imposed on him which guarantees he’s in the country when needed aside from the more subjective argument that a man of his type of reputation who has his entire life vested in amman (many factories that employee thousands, an extended family of do-gooders who have served the country over many generations etc…)  is unlikely not to fight this thing to the bitter end until his name is cleared. further to all this humiliation was the entirely unncessary decision to freeze maani’s assets. this begs the question why? why freeze a person’s assets when we are still in the process of investigating the possibility of “mismanagement”?
     
    the case against maani is so weak and vague, its not corruption, embezzelement or any other charge suggesting financial gain… so why freeze his assets?
     
    if you ask me legal precendent has a lot of weight in the question of bail or no bail. when the average criminal is bailed in jordan, as evident in recent cases of “Salafiyeen” and many many many others, this sets the legal precedents that this is a country that is not keen on detaining people but rather on allowing bail so that one can defend himself in the court of law.
     
    detaining omar maani or any other jordanian then freezing their assets for suspicion of mismanagement is unacceptable… what a shameful day for jordan…
     
     
     

    • R 85389

      why no one asked the same question for those poor in our jails???

    • Abnooz

      He was detained to avoid hiding evidences and arranging with his friends/coworkers/associats.. etc and agree on some arrangment to change/hide things.

  • Ra’ed

    Well, unfortunately in the shadows of the current events, and as i have always knew of the corrupt governmental procedures nothing has horrified me than to know who politicized our judicial system is!
    I mean to put so much power in the hands of the attorney general or his deputy is like stating all the arguments and evidence in the hands of a person that might or might not be corrupt for instance. IS that how constitution works? OMG

  • Ra’ed

    Well, unfortunately in the shadows of the current events, and as i have always knew of the corrupt governmental procedures nothing has horrified me than to know who politicized our judicial system is!
    I mean to put so much power in the hands of the attorney general or his deputy is like stating all the arguments and evidence in the hands of a person that might or might not be corrupt for instance. IS that how constitution works? OMG

  • Ra’ed

    Well, unfortunately in the shadows of the current events, and as i have always knew of the corrupt governmental procedures nothing has horrified me than to know who politicized our judicial system is!
    I mean to put so much power in the hands of the attorney general or his deputy is like stating all the arguments and evidence in the hands of a person that might or might not be corrupt for instance. IS that how constitution works? OMG

  • Ra’ed

    You are not the judge to decide these people are corrupt, simply because they are rich that does not mean they are corrupt. In your word I sense prejudice and hatred towards a class. I suggest you reread the article to discover that it does not defend Maani or Bashir rather it criticizes a system that you and anybody you know might be subject to.

    Please think your words carefully before publishing them; you might hurt people that are innocent.

  • Ra’ed

    You are not the judge to decide these people are corrupt, simply because they are rich that does not mean they are corrupt. In your word I sense prejudice and hatred towards a class. I suggest you reread the article to discover that it does not defend Maani or Bashir rather it criticizes a system that you and anybody you know might be subject to.

    Please think your words carefully before publishing them; you might hurt people that are innocent.

  • raed

    dear taleb,

    i understand that you are upset and want to fight corruption we all do. however, this is not the way.

    -you fight corruption by going after the big “dynasties” they are the sons of corrupt fathers and corrupt grandfathers. where are these people? why aren’t they being brought to justice?

    – you fight corruption by fighting corruption! you do not fight corruption by wasting tax payer’s money on “failure to perform public duties” what is that exactly? are they kidding us?

    please i ask you as a citizen of jordan to open you eyes and read up against all the overwhelming evidence that clearly indicates that mayor maani is being attached, defamed and framed. 

    1. his case files were withdrawn from the Anti Corruption Comittee and transfered to the judiciary… the Anti-Corruption Committee went on Roya TV (available on youtube) stating his surprise with what happend… isnt this strange to you? it is to most jordanians who are following the case and who are not fooled by this. 

    2. the ex-mayor is being tried for “failure to perform public duties” what is that? like i said, we need the big fish, this is a waste of time

    3. the jordan times front page 2 days ago says the judiciary still hasnt found evidence, this is while he was still detained. why is he detained then? why detain him of all jordanians who get bail easily?

    something smells very funny. i beg you to keep and open mind and ask for a better jordan by not allowing the government to use him or anyone as a scapegoat.

    JORDANIANS WILL NOT BE FOOLED!

  • raed

    dear taleb,

    i understand that you are upset and want to fight corruption we all do. however, this is not the way.

    -you fight corruption by going after the big “dynasties” they are the sons of corrupt fathers and corrupt grandfathers. where are these people? why aren’t they being brought to justice?

    – you fight corruption by fighting corruption! you do not fight corruption by wasting tax payer’s money on “failure to perform public duties” what is that exactly? are they kidding us?

    please i ask you as a citizen of jordan to open you eyes and read up against all the overwhelming evidence that clearly indicates that mayor maani is being attached, defamed and framed. 

    1. his case files were withdrawn from the Anti Corruption Comittee and transfered to the judiciary… the Anti-Corruption Committee went on Roya TV (available on youtube) stating his surprise with what happend… isnt this strange to you? it is to most jordanians who are following the case and who are not fooled by this. 

    2. the ex-mayor is being tried for “failure to perform public duties” what is that? like i said, we need the big fish, this is a waste of time

    3. the jordan times front page 2 days ago says the judiciary still hasnt found evidence, this is while he was still detained. why is he detained then? why detain him of all jordanians who get bail easily?

    something smells very funny. i beg you to keep and open mind and ask for a better jordan by not allowing the government to use him or anyone as a scapegoat.

    JORDANIANS WILL NOT BE FOOLED!

  • Guest 007

    Hey people, before starting talking about the power of the attorney general or judges and accusing them of having so much power, read the law, please, read, read, read, read, read ….

    http://www.lob.gov.jo/ui/laws/search_no.jsp?no=76&year=1951

    7iber, this is the 5th article about the Manni case, why don’t you organize a hashtage debate and bring over some judges?

    • Jorge

      I agree with 007 since the start of the debate. I believe Lana is mixing some emotions with facts. I am no lawyer but I have experience in anti-corruption measures. Attorney General and Anti-Corruption Agency (ACA), in general, usually enjoy what is called “Sweeping Powers” in order to be able to eradicate corruption.
      Lana please read about Singapore and Hong Kong ACA experiences they are role models around the world. This will give you more insight around the modus-operandi of ACA. Jordan is not anywhere near them, but I was very glad to know that we have a delegation from the Jordanian ACA visiting Singapore. We are moving in the right direction. Hasta Pronto!!!

  • Guest 007

    Hey people, before starting talking about the power of the attorney general or judges and accusing them of having so much power, read the law, please, read, read, read, read, read ….

    http://www.lob.gov.jo/ui/laws/search_no.jsp?no=76&year=1951

    7iber, this is the 5th article about the Manni case, why don’t you organize a hashtage debate and bring over some judges?

    • Jorge

      I agree with 007 since the start of the debate. I believe Lana is mixing some emotions with facts. I am no lawyer but I have experience in anti-corruption measures. Attorney General and Anti-Corruption Agency (ACA), in general, usually enjoy what is called “Sweeping Powers” in order to be able to eradicate corruption.
      Lana please read about Singapore and Hong Kong ACA experiences they are role models around the world. This will give you more insight around the modus-operandi of ACA. Jordan is not anywhere near them, but I was very glad to know that we have a delegation from the Jordanian ACA visiting Singapore. We are moving in the right direction. Hasta Pronto!!!

  • Fng

    As a Proud Jordanian living abroad it aches me to see what we have come to. I am no lawyer nor do I claim to understand the intricacies of the judicial system. But any lay person understands the concept of innocent until proven otherwise. Have we become so blinded by propaganda that it comforts us to know “someone” or anyone is behind bars.

    To deny bail for no apparent reason seems somewhat concerning. They pose no risk to themselves or society. Also flight risk is not a concern in a country like Jordan where anyone can be easily traced and the stakes too high.

    I would hope that the Jordanian stop pointing fingers and rather reflect on what reform and improvement really means.

  • Fng

    As a Proud Jordanian living abroad it aches me to see what we have come to. I am no lawyer nor do I claim to understand the intricacies of the judicial system. But any lay person understands the concept of innocent until proven otherwise. Have we become so blinded by propaganda that it comforts us to know “someone” or anyone is behind bars.

    To deny bail for no apparent reason seems somewhat concerning. They pose no risk to themselves or society. Also flight risk is not a concern in a country like Jordan where anyone can be easily traced and the stakes too high.

    I would hope that the Jordanian stop pointing fingers and rather reflect on what reform and improvement really means.

  • Kamal

    Amazing how many people Maani managed to buy with our tax money.  His gang are nothing but
    junk yard dogs polluting the Jordanian media and cyberspace with their barking
    trying to turn a dishonorable man who made tens of thousands of
    Jordanians poor into a causes célèbres by looting our tax money. There are
    many reasons why the Jordanian justice system is screwed up but most of
    these cases affect Jordanians with no wealth or connection or principled
    Jordanians who spoke their mind. The Maani case is a test of how far corruption money
    can go in protecting the corrupt and in undermining out justice system.
    The pressure applied to free Maani was a defeat for our justice system. You have effectively took Jordan back a notch.

    • Salameh

      Do you have a proof of Maani’s corruption and how he made tens of thousands of Jordanians poor?

      • Tamer

        Was anyone able to prove ben Ali or Mubarak or any Arab tyrant and their gangsters corrupt before the revolutions? When you have a corrupt Arab dictator everyone around him are corrupt. That’s a universal truth not an opinion. Why do you think there’s no alternative to a total revolution. Because people like you can bask in the knowledge that an utterly corrupt regime will prevent anyone from finding the truth. Do use your real name please. There will be a time soon where all of the garbage will be swept away into the trash bin of Jordanian history where it belongs with other deposed tyrants and their mercenaries.

        • informed citizen

          Dear Tamer,
          Maani is not being tried for Corruption. He is being tried for Failure to Perform Public Duties. I think you are an angry uninformed citizen and if was Maani I would sue you for defamation when this is all over.

          COMMENT RESPONSIBLY.

          • Guest

            Do you honestly believe that we have any faith in the Jordanian regime’s “legal” system? Do you actually think a corrupt system can rid itself of its own corruption?  I don’t think most reform-minded Jordanians really believed Maani or anyone at his level will be charged with anything. Those who cashed in on Maani’s corruption make up a vast network of powerful individuals who will see to it that his conviction will be an impossibility. The accusation itself reeks of corruption.The charge of Failure to Perform Public Duties is proof that the corrupt regime cannot fight its own corruption. This is a rotten hopelessly corrupt regime and you are part of it. Like I said, I dare you to post your real name. Believe me when I say that the day of reckoning is near and all of you vampires will pay dearly for what you have done to Jordan. I pray that in post-revolutionary Jordan, the legal system adopts Chines style anti-corruption laws including execution of corrupt high level officials and executives.

          • Hafezh234

            Dear Guest,

            Let me summarize the story for you so you can open your eyes to the facts… i like facts:

            1. ex-prime minister bakheet transferred omar maani’s cases to the anti-corruption committee… who’s job it is to investigate such cases

            2. a random group of parliamentarians (friends of bakheet- who call themselves the 4th committee) withdrew the files from the anti-corruption commission before they had time to finish their investigation

            WHY?

            DOESN’T THIS LOOK STRANGE TO YOU?

            WHY DO A GROUP OF RANDOM PARLIAMENTARIANS HAVE THE POWER TO WITHDRAW FILES FROM THE COMMITTEE WHO’S JOB IT IS TO INVESTIGATE CORRUPTION?

            IF YOU READ UP ON WHO IS ON THIS COMMITTEE YOU’LL FIND THAT MANY OF THE MEMBERS HAVE A CLEAR CONFLICT ON INTEREST AND CANNOT BE OBJECTIVE IN JUDGING MAANI’S WORK. SOME OF THEM USED TO WORK AT THE GAM, OTHERS ARE BEING INVESTIGATED THEMSELVES FOR ACTUAL CORRUPTION.

            If you ask me the DISGUSTING  way in which Mr. Maani is being investigated shows that the anti-corruption campaign is corrupt in of its self.

            The govt should leave the Anti-Corruption Committee alone to do its job. They are the only independent body able to do it and do it without political pressures.

            As for Mr. Maani he’s innocent until proven guilty.

            Please read, read, read, then decide.
            Thank you

  • Kamal

    Amazing how many people Maani managed to buy with our tax money.  His gang are nothing but
    junk yard dogs polluting the Jordanian media and cyberspace with their barking
    trying to turn a dishonorable man who made tens of thousands of
    Jordanians poor into a causes célèbres by looting our tax money. There are
    many reasons why the Jordanian justice system is screwed up but most of
    these cases affect Jordanians with no wealth or connection or principled
    Jordanians who spoke their mind. The Maani case is a test of how far corruption money
    can go in protecting the corrupt and in undermining out justice system.
    The pressure applied to free Maani was a defeat for our justice system. You have effectively took Jordan back a notch.

    • Salameh

      Do you have a proof of Maani’s corruption and how he made tens of thousands of Jordanians poor?

      • Tamer

        Was anyone able to prove ben Ali or Mubarak or any Arab tyrant and their gangsters corrupt before the revolutions? When you have a corrupt Arab dictator everyone around him are corrupt. That’s a universal truth not an opinion. Why do you think there’s no alternative to a total revolution. Because people like you can bask in the knowledge that an utterly corrupt regime will prevent anyone from finding the truth. Do use your real name please. There will be a time soon where all of the garbage will be swept away into the trash bin of Jordanian history where it belongs with other deposed tyrants and their mercenaries.

        • informed citizen

          Dear Tamer,
          Maani is not being tried for Corruption. He is being tried for Failure to Perform Public Duties. I think you are an angry uninformed citizen and if was Maani I would sue you for defamation when this is all over.

          COMMENT RESPONSIBLY.

          • Guest

            Do you honestly believe that we have any faith in the Jordanian regime’s “legal” system? Do you actually think a corrupt system can rid itself of its own corruption?  I don’t think most reform-minded Jordanians really believed Maani or anyone at his level will be charged with anything. Those who cashed in on Maani’s corruption make up a vast network of powerful individuals who will see to it that his conviction will be an impossibility. The accusation itself reeks of corruption.The charge of Failure to Perform Public Duties is proof that the corrupt regime cannot fight its own corruption. This is a rotten hopelessly corrupt regime and you are part of it. Like I said, I dare you to post your real name. Believe me when I say that the day of reckoning is near and all of you vampires will pay dearly for what you have done to Jordan. I pray that in post-revolutionary Jordan, the legal system adopts Chines style anti-corruption laws including execution of corrupt high level officials and executives.

          • Hafezh234

            Dear Guest,

            Let me summarize the story for you so you can open your eyes to the facts… i like facts:

            1. ex-prime minister bakheet transferred omar maani’s cases to the anti-corruption committee… who’s job it is to investigate such cases

            2. a random group of parliamentarians (friends of bakheet- who call themselves the 4th committee) withdrew the files from the anti-corruption commission before they had time to finish their investigation

            WHY?

            DOESN’T THIS LOOK STRANGE TO YOU?

            WHY DO A GROUP OF RANDOM PARLIAMENTARIANS HAVE THE POWER TO WITHDRAW FILES FROM THE COMMITTEE WHO’S JOB IT IS TO INVESTIGATE CORRUPTION?

            IF YOU READ UP ON WHO IS ON THIS COMMITTEE YOU’LL FIND THAT MANY OF THE MEMBERS HAVE A CLEAR CONFLICT ON INTEREST AND CANNOT BE OBJECTIVE IN JUDGING MAANI’S WORK. SOME OF THEM USED TO WORK AT THE GAM, OTHERS ARE BEING INVESTIGATED THEMSELVES FOR ACTUAL CORRUPTION.

            If you ask me the DISGUSTING  way in which Mr. Maani is being investigated shows that the anti-corruption campaign is corrupt in of its self.

            The govt should leave the Anti-Corruption Committee alone to do its job. They are the only independent body able to do it and do it without political pressures.

            As for Mr. Maani he’s innocent until proven guilty.

            Please read, read, read, then decide.
            Thank you

  • Kamal

    Amazing how many people Maani managed to buy with our tax money.  His gang are nothing but
    junk yard dogs polluting the Jordanian media and cyberspace with their barking
    trying to turn a dishonorable man who made tens of thousands of
    Jordanians poor into a causes célèbres by looting our tax money. There are
    many reasons why the Jordanian justice system is screwed up but most of
    these cases affect Jordanians with no wealth or connection or principled
    Jordanians who spoke their mind. The Maani case is a test of how far corruption money
    can go in protecting the corrupt and in undermining out justice system.
    The pressure applied to free Maani was a defeat for our justice system. You have effectively took Jordan back a notch.

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING TRIED FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLy

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING TRIED FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING TRIED FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLy

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING TRIED FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY 

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    Sarayazan11 1 comment collapsed Collapse Expand
    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY
     

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY 

  • informed citizen

    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY

  • informed citizen

    Sarayazan11 1 comment collapsed Collapse Expand
    OMAR MAANI IS NOT BEING INVESTIGATED (NOT EVEN IN TRIAL YET) FOR CORRUPTION!

    JORDANIANS ITS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMENT RESPONSIBLY
     

  • Khafez234

    Dear Guest,

    Let me summarize the story for you so you can open your eyes to the facts… i like facts:

    1. ex-prime minister bakheet transferred omar maani’s cases to the anti-corruption committee… who’s job it is to investigate such cases

    2. a random group of parliamentarians (friends of bakheet- who call themselves the 4th committee) withdrew the files from the anti-corruption commission before they had time to finish their investigation

    WHY?

    DOESN’T THIS LOOK STRANGE TO YOU?

    WHY DO A GROUP OF RANDOM PARLIAMENTARIANS HAVE THE POWER TO WITHDRAW FILES FROM THE COMMITTEE WHO’S JOB IT IS TO INVESTIGATE CORRUPTION?

    IF YOU READ UP ON WHO IS ON THIS COMMITTEE YOU’LL FIND THAT MANY OF THE MEMBERS HAVE A CLEAR CONFLICT ON INTEREST AND CANNOT BE OBJECTIVE IN JUDGING MAANI’S WORK. SOME OF THEM USED TO WORK AT THE GAM, OTHERS ARE BEING INVESTIGATED THEMSELVES FOR ACTUAL CORRUPTION.

    If you ask me the DISGUSTING  way in which Mr. Maani is being investigated shows that the anti-corruption campaign is corrupt in of its self.

    The govt should leave the Anti-Corruption Committee alone to do its job. They are the only independent body able to do it and do it without political pressures.

    As for Mr. Maani he’s innocent until proven guilty.

    Please read, read, read, then decide.
    Thank you

  • Khafez234

    Dear Guest,

    Let me summarize the story for you so you can open your eyes to the facts… i like facts:

    1. ex-prime minister bakheet transferred omar maani’s cases to the anti-corruption committee… who’s job it is to investigate such cases

    2. a random group of parliamentarians (friends of bakheet- who call themselves the 4th committee) withdrew the files from the anti-corruption commission before they had time to finish their investigation

    WHY?

    DOESN’T THIS LOOK STRANGE TO YOU?

    WHY DO A GROUP OF RANDOM PARLIAMENTARIANS HAVE THE POWER TO WITHDRAW FILES FROM THE COMMITTEE WHO’S JOB IT IS TO INVESTIGATE CORRUPTION?

    IF YOU READ UP ON WHO IS ON THIS COMMITTEE YOU’LL FIND THAT MANY OF THE MEMBERS HAVE A CLEAR CONFLICT ON INTEREST AND CANNOT BE OBJECTIVE IN JUDGING MAANI’S WORK. SOME OF THEM USED TO WORK AT THE GAM, OTHERS ARE BEING INVESTIGATED THEMSELVES FOR ACTUAL CORRUPTION.

    If you ask me the DISGUSTING  way in which Mr. Maani is being investigated shows that the anti-corruption campaign is corrupt in of its self.

    The govt should leave the Anti-Corruption Committee alone to do its job. They are the only independent body able to do it and do it without political pressures.

    As for Mr. Maani he’s innocent until proven guilty.

    Please read, read, read, then decide.
    Thank you

  • Sppiceman3000

    Bold article Lana. I do hope that’s your pseudo name though!! Can’t be too careful as we may be going into a “MacArthan” era as a defence mechanism for a failing economy be it planned or completely arbitrary though the latter seems more likely.. Without doubt evidence must be presented before detaining anyone.
    I’m not a lawyer and I never went to a law school, but I know enough to distinguish between the role of a prosecutor and that of a judge. It is true that the prosecutor presents the people but he does not pass judgment and should not be allowed to do so, this is called separation of authority that we have yet to learn.

  • Sppiceman3000

    Bold article Lana. I do hope that’s your pseudo name though!! Can’t be too careful as we may be going into a “MacArthan” era as a defence mechanism for a failing economy be it planned or completely arbitrary though the latter seems more likely.. Without doubt evidence must be presented before detaining anyone.
    I’m not a lawyer and I never went to a law school, but I know enough to distinguish between the role of a prosecutor and that of a judge. It is true that the prosecutor presents the people but he does not pass judgment and should not be allowed to do so, this is called separation of authority that we have yet to learn.