Spread Your Tentacles with Akhtaboot

الأربعاء 19 أيلول 2007

Akhtaboot.com's logo

Written by Pheras Hilal

As Akhtaboot.com, an online recruitment website continues to engulf more members in its web of professional networking, 7iber sits with the brains and brawls behind the makers of the perky tongue-in-cheek analogy, to shed light on how it all started.

akhtabootlogo

In 2006, MIT-graduate Mohamad Haj Hasan and Georgetown-graduate Yousef Shamoun sat down together to map out a new online venture. After numerous brainstorming sessions to figure out what the market needs, the pair finally decided to put Akhtaboot.com to work in September 2006. “We wanted to create an online website that could benefit both job seekers and employers,” says Shamoun. But Akhtaboot.com’s success did not pan out overnight; the pair had to pour in generous time and efforts to craft the recruitment tool. With the help of Fouad Mardini, developer of Akhtaboot.com, the website finally saw light in July 2007.

The Birth of Akhtaboot

At first, the trio referred friends and relatives to the website, who in turn invited over their buddies to join in on what was perhaps one of the few well-crafted online start-ups in Jordan; if not in the Middle East at large. But hits were still modest, standing in at only 600 hits per week; personal blogs were garnering more attention. But the website’s luck began to turn around, today, the website stands among the 300 most visited websites in Jordan, also with plenty of buzz from the press and praise from the private and public sectors.

akhtaboothospitality“Akhtaboot, is now at a crossroads,” says Shayma Ismael, an interactive media consultant based in Cairo, “this is where Akhtaboot either makes it or breaks it,” adds Ismael. “Normally, after six months of a website’s launch, the website starts garnering exponential growth, and not just steady growth, meaning that at one point, it just has to take off,” says Ismael. And judging by Akhtaboot’s aggressive marketing campaign, there’s only one way to go, and that is up.

The Ideology of Akhtaboot

Akhtaboot partnered up with Play FM, another start-up that also grew to become very popular in the local scene. Job advertisements are now aired on the station’s airwaves and job vacancies are being announced on a regular basis. The website also launched a Facebook application for job seekers to be in the know of any new job openings and offers, there’s a career center tucked away in one of the website’s many tools for job seekers to gain advice and information on how to give their careers a boost. And like most small start-ups, the website is now using Google’s adclicks, to capture more referrals to the website. But Shamoun and Haj Hasan argue that the true strength of Akhtaboot lies in mainly two things: Its brand, and its social networking element. Ismael also agrees that these two elements are the website’s core competencies that set the website apart from its more established rivals.

“We just didn’t want to go for a generic brand like Jordan Jobs,” says Shamoun. According to Ismael, the brand is likely to garner plenty of attention, especially from fresh graduates and young professionals, because it’s quirky, street-wise and playful. “I feel that this brand is truly honest, and hits exactly on the right cords; Akhtaboot means connections and networking, and that’s exactly what the website is all about,” says Ismael.

akhtabootjournalismShamoun and Haj Hasan realize that the website’s most valuable asset is its brand. And now, the firm’s illustrator, Natalie Hijazi, crafts out new comic strips that are geared towards job seekers. “They [comic strips] are useful, first, because more users might come back just to enjoy the humor, which makes it a “sticky” website,” says Ismael, “Also, it gives the website more character and charm,” adds Ismael. Haj Hasan reasons that the comic strips can enhance the brand’s value in the eyes of its consumers. It helps people to associate and familiarize themselves with the brand.

What sets Akhtaboot apart from most Jordanian brands, is that it can actually build a culture around the brand. “Innovate and polarize,” says Haj Hasan; that is the main premise and “ideology” of the website. “Building on that, will get many customers,” says Ismael, “I know for a fact, that the Middle Eastern market is hungry for brains and creativity, and Akhtaboot is the right place to find both,” adds Ismael.

The Future of Akhtaboot

“Our main aim is not money, we want to raise the bar for [quality] of the websites in the region,”Shamoun and Haj Hasan want their website to continue its growth. They plan on penetrating the lucrative Gulf market by adding an Arabic interface and improving existing features while churning out new tools for job seekers and companies. “We want to grow…but our main aim is not money, we want to raise the bar for [quality] of the websites in the region,” says Haj Hasan. And by looking at the website now, many other online firms are already scrambling to keep up with the new competition.

  • The report makes it sound as if Jordan is awash with jobs that there aren’t enough candidates to fill all of those vacancies. In fact the reality speaks other wise, to put it plainly; there aren’t any vacant jobs in Jordan. I’m willing to put my nick on the line and estimate roughly that there are at least between 500 to 1000 candidates qualified available for each job opening. What would be the point of posting your resume on a website if the chance of having your resume reviewed by a hiring recruiter is close to zero or even in the negative? In my opinion these kinds of websites are good for countries like the Gulf states and Saudi Arabia, but as far as Jordan is concerned all the jobs gets filled long before they even get advertised in any newspaper or websites. The demand exceeds the supplies by about 300000 jobs short.

  • The report makes it sound as if Jordan is awash with jobs that there aren’t enough candidates to fill all of those vacancies. In fact the reality speaks other wise, to put it plainly; there aren’t any vacant jobs in Jordan. I’m willing to put my nick on the line and estimate roughly that there are at least between 500 to 1000 candidates qualified available for each job opening. What would be the point of posting your resume on a website if the chance of having your resume reviewed by a hiring recruiter is close to zero or even in the negative? In my opinion these kinds of websites are good for countries like the Gulf states and Saudi Arabia, but as far as Jordan is concerned all the jobs gets filled long before they even get advertised in any newspaper or websites. The demand exceeds the supplies by about 300000 jobs short.

  • The report makes it sound as if Jordan is awash with jobs that there aren’t enough candidates to fill all of those vacancies. In fact the reality speaks other wise, to put it plainly; there aren’t any vacant jobs in Jordan. I’m willing to put my nick on the line and estimate roughly that there are at least between 500 to 1000 candidates qualified available for each job opening. What would be the point of posting your resume on a website if the chance of having your resume reviewed by a hiring recruiter is close to zero or even in the negative? In my opinion these kinds of websites are good for countries like the Gulf states and Saudi Arabia, but as far as Jordan is concerned all the jobs gets filled long before they even get advertised in any newspaper or websites. The demand exceeds the supplies by about 300000 jobs short.

  • Hatem,

    I have to disagree with you, rather strongly actually.

    The papers are full of vacancy ads.

    As an owner of a business that employs around 20 people, I can tell you that finding qualified people in our field (Design, media, technology) is HARD. Sometimes VERY HARD.

    Finding qualified people is my No.1 problem.

    When we post a job ad, we indeed get a lot of CVs. But most of the people we receive CV’s from (and also meet) simply are not up to the challenge.

    You can blame the educational system and the prevailing work culture for that. It is amazing how many young people we meet, who are already without ambition or interests the day the graduate.

    The architectural sector is also struggling with the people issue. Of course that’s easily explainable: the construction boom.

    There is big unemployment in Jordan. No doubt about that. Yet we have to admit that the problem is often lack of qualification, or simply refusal to accept jobs for social reasons.

  • Hatem,

    I have to disagree with you, rather strongly actually.

    The papers are full of vacancy ads.

    As an owner of a business that employs around 20 people, I can tell you that finding qualified people in our field (Design, media, technology) is HARD. Sometimes VERY HARD.

    Finding qualified people is my No.1 problem.

    When we post a job ad, we indeed get a lot of CVs. But most of the people we receive CV’s from (and also meet) simply are not up to the challenge.

    You can blame the educational system and the prevailing work culture for that. It is amazing how many young people we meet, who are already without ambition or interests the day the graduate.

    The architectural sector is also struggling with the people issue. Of course that’s easily explainable: the construction boom.

    There is big unemployment in Jordan. No doubt about that. Yet we have to admit that the problem is often lack of qualification, or simply refusal to accept jobs for social reasons.

  • Hatem,

    I have to disagree with you, rather strongly actually.

    The papers are full of vacancy ads.

    As an owner of a business that employs around 20 people, I can tell you that finding qualified people in our field (Design, media, technology) is HARD. Sometimes VERY HARD.

    Finding qualified people is my No.1 problem.

    When we post a job ad, we indeed get a lot of CVs. But most of the people we receive CV’s from (and also meet) simply are not up to the challenge.

    You can blame the educational system and the prevailing work culture for that. It is amazing how many young people we meet, who are already without ambition or interests the day the graduate.

    The architectural sector is also struggling with the people issue. Of course that’s easily explainable: the construction boom.

    There is big unemployment in Jordan. No doubt about that. Yet we have to admit that the problem is often lack of qualification, or simply refusal to accept jobs for social reasons.

  • Ahmad,
    First of call congratulation on being an employer, I’m still on the sending end while you are on the receiving end, that is why we may be are having varying views about searching and locating the appropriate place for the person’s niche. In my opinion other than vocational degrees there are no any other university degrees that would qualify the individual for any job. There is a huge difference between the the theoretical stuff that people learn in schools and the applications that they have to do once they become officially employed by a given business firm.Theory is one thing and practice is another.

  • Ahmad,
    First of call congratulation on being an employer, I’m still on the sending end while you are on the receiving end, that is why we may be are having varying views about searching and locating the appropriate place for the person’s niche. In my opinion other than vocational degrees there are no any other university degrees that would qualify the individual for any job. There is a huge difference between the the theoretical stuff that people learn in schools and the applications that they have to do once they become officially employed by a given business firm.Theory is one thing and practice is another.

  • Ahmad,
    First of call congratulation on being an employer, I’m still on the sending end while you are on the receiving end, that is why we may be are having varying views about searching and locating the appropriate place for the person’s niche. In my opinion other than vocational degrees there are no any other university degrees that would qualify the individual for any job. There is a huge difference between the the theoretical stuff that people learn in schools and the applications that they have to do once they become officially employed by a given business firm.Theory is one thing and practice is another.

  • Nas

    Hatem: having researched this problem quite a bit these past few months, I’ve discovered that everyone, from NGO’s to students to CEO’s to the Minister of Education himself, are in consensus about one thing: university does not prepare these people for a real job. It isn’t merely about the difference between theory and practice, but a whole lot of other things.

    Students are not allowed to think for themselves, to think creatively and independently. Many of them have never done a presentation or lead a class discussion. Hardly any of them have ever debated. Thus its not merely the degree that becomes useless, but the characteristics of the person.

    Ahmad is right. There are tons of vacancies in the papers, which is something I was surprised to find when I first got here. But now I see how hard it is for employers to hire. None of these students are qualified.

  • Nas

    Hatem: having researched this problem quite a bit these past few months, I’ve discovered that everyone, from NGO’s to students to CEO’s to the Minister of Education himself, are in consensus about one thing: university does not prepare these people for a real job. It isn’t merely about the difference between theory and practice, but a whole lot of other things.

    Students are not allowed to think for themselves, to think creatively and independently. Many of them have never done a presentation or lead a class discussion. Hardly any of them have ever debated. Thus its not merely the degree that becomes useless, but the characteristics of the person.

    Ahmad is right. There are tons of vacancies in the papers, which is something I was surprised to find when I first got here. But now I see how hard it is for employers to hire. None of these students are qualified.

  • Nas

    Hatem: having researched this problem quite a bit these past few months, I’ve discovered that everyone, from NGO’s to students to CEO’s to the Minister of Education himself, are in consensus about one thing: university does not prepare these people for a real job. It isn’t merely about the difference between theory and practice, but a whole lot of other things.

    Students are not allowed to think for themselves, to think creatively and independently. Many of them have never done a presentation or lead a class discussion. Hardly any of them have ever debated. Thus its not merely the degree that becomes useless, but the characteristics of the person.

    Ahmad is right. There are tons of vacancies in the papers, which is something I was surprised to find when I first got here. But now I see how hard it is for employers to hire. None of these students are qualified.

  • Having used sites like Monster (arguably the largest job site in the world) while living in the US, and Bayt.com (the # 1 mideast job site according to them) while living in Jordan, my experience with both was quite poor. Now I’m working in the UK and had to send out hundreds of job applications this year, I came to one conclusion:
    The only job-seeker tools that are of real value to users are the ones associated with big daily newspapers. The Guardian, for example, has by far the most useful “non-specialized” jobs website in the entire UK.
    As for diversity of service, Akhtaboot and Bayt, are (or will be) offering market surveys, advice, networking opportunities and other things that are fun to read and take part in. But at the end of the day it is the quality and the “validity” of the job posts that the portal’s future will depend on. And sometimes it’s the market’s fault for being to weak, not the jobs websites.
    But like Haj-Hassan & Shamoun said, they’re not going for the money only, Akhtaboot will stand out as an innovative and ground breaking Arab website, sort of like a big fish in a small pond.

  • Having used sites like Monster (arguably the largest job site in the world) while living in the US, and Bayt.com (the # 1 mideast job site according to them) while living in Jordan, my experience with both was quite poor. Now I’m working in the UK and had to send out hundreds of job applications this year, I came to one conclusion:
    The only job-seeker tools that are of real value to users are the ones associated with big daily newspapers. The Guardian, for example, has by far the most useful “non-specialized” jobs website in the entire UK.
    As for diversity of service, Akhtaboot and Bayt, are (or will be) offering market surveys, advice, networking opportunities and other things that are fun to read and take part in. But at the end of the day it is the quality and the “validity” of the job posts that the portal’s future will depend on. And sometimes it’s the market’s fault for being to weak, not the jobs websites.
    But like Haj-Hassan & Shamoun said, they’re not going for the money only, Akhtaboot will stand out as an innovative and ground breaking Arab website, sort of like a big fish in a small pond.

  • Having used sites like Monster (arguably the largest job site in the world) while living in the US, and Bayt.com (the # 1 mideast job site according to them) while living in Jordan, my experience with both was quite poor. Now I’m working in the UK and had to send out hundreds of job applications this year, I came to one conclusion:
    The only job-seeker tools that are of real value to users are the ones associated with big daily newspapers. The Guardian, for example, has by far the most useful “non-specialized” jobs website in the entire UK.
    As for diversity of service, Akhtaboot and Bayt, are (or will be) offering market surveys, advice, networking opportunities and other things that are fun to read and take part in. But at the end of the day it is the quality and the “validity” of the job posts that the portal’s future will depend on. And sometimes it’s the market’s fault for being to weak, not the jobs websites.
    But like Haj-Hassan & Shamoun said, they’re not going for the money only, Akhtaboot will stand out as an innovative and ground breaking Arab website, sort of like a big fish in a small pond.

  • Thank you Imad, very informative analysis above.

    Nas : I know what you mean about college kids not being ready for presentations, I was one of them.

  • Thank you Imad, very informative analysis above.

    Nas : I know what you mean about college kids not being ready for presentations, I was one of them.

  • Thank you Imad, very informative analysis above.

    Nas : I know what you mean about college kids not being ready for presentations, I was one of them.

  • I agree with Naseem and Ahmad, talent is becoming razor-thin in Jordan, and it’s even becoming more scarce all around the globe (The Economist dedicated 4 issues in the span of 3 months to talk about it – that’s big news).

    But also, Imad, when it comes to Jordan, there’s a higher chance for creative firms to find talents through websites like Akhtaboot and Bayt, because in Jordan, there’s this idea for jobseekers that if he/she sends out proposals to every firm (regardless of relevancy to their field of study), then that would increase their chances at getting a job.

    While a creative firm would need a more narrowed and structured search engine, and Akhtaboot really provides that. See, a user joins a certain amount of communities (3 actually), and by joining these communities, you are obliged to stick to posting your CV to companies within these communities. Meaning that if you own let’s say a dental office, you won’t be getting CVs from a graphic designer (which is by far, the biggest problem that HR managers face today in Jordan).

  • I agree with Naseem and Ahmad, talent is becoming razor-thin in Jordan, and it’s even becoming more scarce all around the globe (The Economist dedicated 4 issues in the span of 3 months to talk about it – that’s big news).

    But also, Imad, when it comes to Jordan, there’s a higher chance for creative firms to find talents through websites like Akhtaboot and Bayt, because in Jordan, there’s this idea for jobseekers that if he/she sends out proposals to every firm (regardless of relevancy to their field of study), then that would increase their chances at getting a job.

    While a creative firm would need a more narrowed and structured search engine, and Akhtaboot really provides that. See, a user joins a certain amount of communities (3 actually), and by joining these communities, you are obliged to stick to posting your CV to companies within these communities. Meaning that if you own let’s say a dental office, you won’t be getting CVs from a graphic designer (which is by far, the biggest problem that HR managers face today in Jordan).

  • I agree with Naseem and Ahmad, talent is becoming razor-thin in Jordan, and it’s even becoming more scarce all around the globe (The Economist dedicated 4 issues in the span of 3 months to talk about it – that’s big news).

    But also, Imad, when it comes to Jordan, there’s a higher chance for creative firms to find talents through websites like Akhtaboot and Bayt, because in Jordan, there’s this idea for jobseekers that if he/she sends out proposals to every firm (regardless of relevancy to their field of study), then that would increase their chances at getting a job.

    While a creative firm would need a more narrowed and structured search engine, and Akhtaboot really provides that. See, a user joins a certain amount of communities (3 actually), and by joining these communities, you are obliged to stick to posting your CV to companies within these communities. Meaning that if you own let’s say a dental office, you won’t be getting CVs from a graphic designer (which is by far, the biggest problem that HR managers face today in Jordan).

  • Pheras,

    I concur with the last part of your reply alluding to the fact that if you display your portrait in an industry specific you elevate the ante of your chances for being reviewed by a head hunter, notwithstanding; this testimony wasn’t highlighted in your main article. I do support the idea of being niche specific meaning that one should manifest one’s skills in one/s own industry publications, be that a network, career building sites, or classified section of some sort. One should never display his curriculum vita and hope for the best. Job seekers must utilize various other traditional and non traditional ways and means to reach the decision makers in business firms. Marketing individual skills is just as intricate as selling fully researched, developed, manufactured, and packaged goods.

  • Pheras,

    I concur with the last part of your reply alluding to the fact that if you display your portrait in an industry specific you elevate the ante of your chances for being reviewed by a head hunter, notwithstanding; this testimony wasn’t highlighted in your main article. I do support the idea of being niche specific meaning that one should manifest one’s skills in one/s own industry publications, be that a network, career building sites, or classified section of some sort. One should never display his curriculum vita and hope for the best. Job seekers must utilize various other traditional and non traditional ways and means to reach the decision makers in business firms. Marketing individual skills is just as intricate as selling fully researched, developed, manufactured, and packaged goods.

  • Pheras,

    I concur with the last part of your reply alluding to the fact that if you display your portrait in an industry specific you elevate the ante of your chances for being reviewed by a head hunter, notwithstanding; this testimony wasn’t highlighted in your main article. I do support the idea of being niche specific meaning that one should manifest one’s skills in one/s own industry publications, be that a network, career building sites, or classified section of some sort. One should never display his curriculum vita and hope for the best. Job seekers must utilize various other traditional and non traditional ways and means to reach the decision makers in business firms. Marketing individual skills is just as intricate as selling fully researched, developed, manufactured, and packaged goods.

  • Hatem, thanks for your feedback. That’s what I really like about online space: You get to obtain direct feedback from the readers, and you start looking more at things from a reader’s perspective (which is vital in journalism).

    But see, that’s where I beg to differ: The purpose of my article wasn’t really to discuss how Akhtaboot employs relatively new technology to the region, which enables it to fine-tune search results upon displaying your CV as a job seeker, or as an employer browsing through submitted CVs. The idea was to shed light on Akhtaboot, as an online start-up, how it employed clever branding to emerge as a force to be reckoned with in the online realm. The reason I did not get into specifics on how Akhtaboot is different or similar to other online recruitment tools and websites, is that I like to give more chance for the reader to discover things on their own: You read the article, you’re either interested in learning about Akhtaboot furthermore or you’re not. If yes, you head to Akhtaboot.com and start learning more about the website, and discover its pleasant surprises.

    I believe that reading is a two-way street: A writer writes, and the reader reads, then acts upon what they read. In this case, it is going to Akhtaboot, and trying to figure out on your own, what makes it really special. I picked out two things that make the website special, and the rest is up to the readers. Plus let’s be honest, I had to set a word limit too…:-)

  • Hatem, thanks for your feedback. That’s what I really like about online space: You get to obtain direct feedback from the readers, and you start looking more at things from a reader’s perspective (which is vital in journalism).

    But see, that’s where I beg to differ: The purpose of my article wasn’t really to discuss how Akhtaboot employs relatively new technology to the region, which enables it to fine-tune search results upon displaying your CV as a job seeker, or as an employer browsing through submitted CVs. The idea was to shed light on Akhtaboot, as an online start-up, how it employed clever branding to emerge as a force to be reckoned with in the online realm. The reason I did not get into specifics on how Akhtaboot is different or similar to other online recruitment tools and websites, is that I like to give more chance for the reader to discover things on their own: You read the article, you’re either interested in learning about Akhtaboot furthermore or you’re not. If yes, you head to Akhtaboot.com and start learning more about the website, and discover its pleasant surprises.

    I believe that reading is a two-way street: A writer writes, and the reader reads, then acts upon what they read. In this case, it is going to Akhtaboot, and trying to figure out on your own, what makes it really special. I picked out two things that make the website special, and the rest is up to the readers. Plus let’s be honest, I had to set a word limit too…:-)

  • Hatem, thanks for your feedback. That’s what I really like about online space: You get to obtain direct feedback from the readers, and you start looking more at things from a reader’s perspective (which is vital in journalism).

    But see, that’s where I beg to differ: The purpose of my article wasn’t really to discuss how Akhtaboot employs relatively new technology to the region, which enables it to fine-tune search results upon displaying your CV as a job seeker, or as an employer browsing through submitted CVs. The idea was to shed light on Akhtaboot, as an online start-up, how it employed clever branding to emerge as a force to be reckoned with in the online realm. The reason I did not get into specifics on how Akhtaboot is different or similar to other online recruitment tools and websites, is that I like to give more chance for the reader to discover things on their own: You read the article, you’re either interested in learning about Akhtaboot furthermore or you’re not. If yes, you head to Akhtaboot.com and start learning more about the website, and discover its pleasant surprises.

    I believe that reading is a two-way street: A writer writes, and the reader reads, then acts upon what they read. In this case, it is going to Akhtaboot, and trying to figure out on your own, what makes it really special. I picked out two things that make the website special, and the rest is up to the readers. Plus let’s be honest, I had to set a word limit too…:-)

  • Pheras,
    Please note that I have no qualms about your esteemed presentation, you did a very good job by showing what is Aktaboot all about, I’m sure that some people will benefit from their services, I was only reflecting my very own personal experience with places like Aktaboot. I have never benefited from services similar to Aktaboot. I did visit their page as well as your page and I liked what I saw in there.Thank you for replying and for your continued interest.

  • Pheras,
    Please note that I have no qualms about your esteemed presentation, you did a very good job by showing what is Aktaboot all about, I’m sure that some people will benefit from their services, I was only reflecting my very own personal experience with places like Aktaboot. I have never benefited from services similar to Aktaboot. I did visit their page as well as your page and I liked what I saw in there.Thank you for replying and for your continued interest.

  • Pheras,
    Please note that I have no qualms about your esteemed presentation, you did a very good job by showing what is Aktaboot all about, I’m sure that some people will benefit from their services, I was only reflecting my very own personal experience with places like Aktaboot. I have never benefited from services similar to Aktaboot. I did visit their page as well as your page and I liked what I saw in there.Thank you for replying and for your continued interest.

  • Thanks Hatem, I appreciate it. You see, that’s what’s different about Akhtaboot, it has this social networking element: Assume that you know a friend that works in let’s say Intel Middle East. This friend keeps a strong relationship with the HR department in Intel, and once Intel posts a job, this friend would recommend you because well, he knows your capabilities and strengths and weaknesses. Akhtaboot basically brings the element that is truly the strongest factor that could secure you a job, which is a recommendation or a referral.

    This works well in the Middle East, because from what I’ve noticed, most companies hire people through other people, and not through newspapers or classifieds.

  • Thanks Hatem, I appreciate it. You see, that’s what’s different about Akhtaboot, it has this social networking element: Assume that you know a friend that works in let’s say Intel Middle East. This friend keeps a strong relationship with the HR department in Intel, and once Intel posts a job, this friend would recommend you because well, he knows your capabilities and strengths and weaknesses. Akhtaboot basically brings the element that is truly the strongest factor that could secure you a job, which is a recommendation or a referral.

    This works well in the Middle East, because from what I’ve noticed, most companies hire people through other people, and not through newspapers or classifieds.

  • Thanks Hatem, I appreciate it. You see, that’s what’s different about Akhtaboot, it has this social networking element: Assume that you know a friend that works in let’s say Intel Middle East. This friend keeps a strong relationship with the HR department in Intel, and once Intel posts a job, this friend would recommend you because well, he knows your capabilities and strengths and weaknesses. Akhtaboot basically brings the element that is truly the strongest factor that could secure you a job, which is a recommendation or a referral.

    This works well in the Middle East, because from what I’ve noticed, most companies hire people through other people, and not through newspapers or classifieds.

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  • I hope you are success in your project
    best regards

  • I hope you are success in your project
    best regards

  • I hope you are success in your project
    best regards

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